Diane May Nutrition Blog

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How Not To Bloat

November 5th, 2021

Have you ever eaten a delicious meal and then look like you are nine months pregnant? Bloat is actually a buildup of gas in the stomach and intestines, and if you have ever experienced it, it isn’t fun! Gass producing foods, IBS, menstruation and constipation are just a few of the reasons you may be experiencing bloat. There are many reasons you may develop bloat and ways to help reduce the symptoms. Foods that may creat bloat include:

  • Fiber. Many people do not get enough fiber, but too much fiber can create bloat. Women should shoot for 21 grams and men 30 grams.
  • FODMAP foods. FODMAP stands for fructans, oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols. These can iritate the GI tract and cause extensive bloat. An RD can help you with this elimination diet to see if any of these foods are your bloat offender. Trying this on your own can be complicated.
  • Artificial sweeteners and sugar alcohols are hard to digest and can cause gas.
  • Sodium: When you consume too much sodium, your body willl hold onto fluid which can make you feel swollen. Try never to consume more than 2300 mg of sodium a day. Stay away from packaged and processed foods.
  • Lactose Intolerance: Not everyone is sensitive to dairy and some dairy is more tolerable than others such as greek yogurt, which is triple strained, but if you notice every time you eat dairy, you get uncomfortable gas or bloating, lactose may be the offender.
  • Remove carbonated beverages, straws, chewing gum, sucking candy or gulp fluids. These things push air into the stomach and can distend the stomach. 
  • High bloat foods: Beans, lentils, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, added sugar, fried and greasy foods and dried fruits are big bloat offenders.

What can you do once you are experiencing bloat?

  • Do not talk and eat at the same time.
  • Take a walk after meals to get your GI tract moving.
  • Slow down when you eat. Chew 20-30 chews per bite and have smaller meals. Put down your silverware between bites or try using your non dominant hand while eating.
  • Drink room temperature beverages and avoid ice cold beverages.
  • Stay well hydrated.
  • Try abdominal massage. Use circular movements and light pressure.
  • Over the counter products such as phazyme, digestive enzymes,  probiotics, DGL and beano can assist with bloat. Always talk to your doctor or RD before taking OTC products.
  • There are some foods that can help reduce bloat: Cucumbers, ginger, green tea, avocado, celery, pineapple, asparagus, kefir, peppermint, zuchinni , kiwi and fennel.

Although bloat can be very uncomfortable, it is usually not serious. Consuming a healthy, well rounded diet can help with bloat, but If you can’t figure out what it is, an RD can help. If bloat becomes chronic, you should always reach out to your physician, especially if it is accompanied by nausea, vomiting and weight loss.

 

This healthy vegetable salad recipe highlights fresh peas, zucchini, fennel, watercress and mint. Serve alongside a roast chicken or turn it into a dinner salad by adding a soft-boiled egg and some cannellini beans.

 

 

Active: 20 mins
Total: 20 mins
Servings: 6

Ingredients

Ingredient Checklist
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Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • If using frozen peas, cook in boiling salted water for 45 seconds to 1 minute. Transfer to a bowl of ice water until cold. Drain well.

  • Trim zucchini and thinly slice on the bias. Slice fennel paper-thin, using a mandoline if you have one.

  • Combine the peas, zucchini and fennel in a large bowl with watercress and mint. Gently toss with oil, lemon zest and juice, salt and pepper. Gently stir in feta. Serve right away, garnished with more mint and/or feta, if desired.

Nutrition Facts

 

 

156 calories; protein 5.6g; carbohydrates 10.3g; dietary fiber 3.6g; sugars 5.2g; fat 11g; saturated fat 3.6g; cholesterol 14.8mg; vitamin a iu 1679IU; vitamin c 39.6mg; folate 54.8mcg; calcium 156.3mg; iron 1.6mg; magnesium 37.1mg; potassium 493.5mg; sodium 281.7mg. 

What to Eat And Do When You Want To Boost Hormones And Feel Your Best

October 8th, 2021

Did you know that women can be in perimenopause for many years before menopause begins, usually 8-10 years prior to menopause! Women usually start to feel the effects of perimenopause in the 40’s, but it can start as early as your 30’s. Some common signs yoiu may be in perimenopause include: hot flashes, weight gain, breast tenderness, fatigue, brain fog, irregular periods, urinary leakage, breast tenderness, vaginal dryness and worsened PMS. Although women will experience perimenopause differently, all women will eventually experience perimenopause and menopause. The changes we experience ar5e due to hormonal fluctuations, especially estrogen. There are things women can do to reduce symptoms and improve quality of life as they go through this normal life stage.

  • Consume foods high in phytoestrogens. A phytoestrogen is a plant-derived xenoestrogen not generated within the endocrine system, but consumed by eating phytoestrogenic plants. Plants that contain phytoestrogens include: Soy, flax, cashews, chickpeas, alfalfa sprouts, sesame seeds, berries, legumes, almonds, garlic, and wheat bran. Incorporating these foods can aide with possible hormonal imbalances.
  • Avoid triggers for hot flashes such as spicy food, alcohol and extreme heat. Dress in layers, and practice deep breathing.
  • Consider a low dose birth control pill to regulate hormones.
  • The usage of antidepressants can reduce incidents of hot flashes and brain fog.
  • Consider supplements. B Vitamins, Vitamin D3, Boron, DHEA, black cohosh, evening primrose oil, and dong quai.
  • Exercise. Strength training and gaining lean muscle mass can help with the weight gain that natgurally occurs as women enter menopause.
  • Stay at a healthy weight. The ebst way to reduce symptoms is to eat a healthy, well rounded diet, sleep well and reduce your stress.

ALWAYS talk to your doctor before you take supplements or start a medication. There are many things you can do to reduce the symptoms of peri menopause and  menopause. Talk to your doctor and RD to create a plan that works for you.

Traditional three-bean salad gets a healthy, fresh spin with the addition of black soybeans, snap peas and a tarragon-infused dressing. Find black soybeans near other canned beans; they’re a sweeter, creamier relative of the green ones you’re probably familiar with.

 

Katie Webster

Source: EatingWell Magazine, May/June 2015

 

Recipe Summary 

Total: 30 mins
Servings: 10
 
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Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Bring 1 inch of water to a boil in a large saucepan fitted with a steamer basket. Add wax beans and snap peas; cover and steam until crisp-tender, 4 to 5 minutes. Spread the vegetables out on a large baking sheet to cool.

  • Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, honey, tarragon, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Add soybeans (or black beans), chickpeas, scallions and the cooled vegetables; toss to coat. Serve at room temperature or cold.

Tips

Make Ahead Tip: Cover and refrigerate for up to 8 hours.

Try homemade beans instead of canned. Start with 1 pound of any type of dry beans and rinse well. Place in a large bowl and cover with 2 inches of cold water. Let soak at least 8 hours or overnight. (If you’re in a hurry, put the beans in a pot and cover with 2 inches of water; bring to boil, boil for 2 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand, covered, for 1 hour.) Drain the beans, transfer to a large pot and cover with 3 inches cold water. Bring to a boil, skimming off any foam. Reduce heat to a gentle simmer; cook, stirring occasionally, until the beans are tender, 30 minutes to 2 hours. (Cooking time varies depending on the type and age of the bean; start checking tenderness at 30 minutes.) Wait until the beans are almost tender to add salt; adding it too early can prevent beans from softening. (Use about 1 teaspoon salt per pound of beans.) Refrigerate beans in their cooking liquid for up to 1 week or freeze for up to 3 months. One pound dry beans makes 5 to 6 cups

Cut Down on Dishes: A rimmed baking sheet is great for everything from roasting to catching accidental drips and spills. For effortless cleanup and to keep your baking sheets in tip-top shape, line them with a layer of foil before each use.

Nutrition Facts

 

 

189 calories; protein 4.3g; carbohydrates 17.5g; dietary fiber 4.5g; sugars 3.4g; fat 11.8g; saturated fat 1.6g; vitamin a iu 255IU; vitamin c 13.4mg; folate 58mcg; calcium 45.5mg; iron 1.7mg; magnesium 19.9mg; potassium 266mg; sodium 337.6mg; thiamin 0.1mg; added sugar 1g.