Diane May Nutrition Blog

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Do You Need Zinc

February 4th, 2021

Zinc is a nutrient found naturally in the body. Aduts contain 2-3 grams of zinc, about 0.1% is eplenished daily. It helps to fight off invading bacteria and viruses ,as well as help with metabolic functions, wound healing, growth, DNA synthesis, gene expression and development and our sense of taste and smell. As we age, zinc levels can be depleted, but a well rounded, complete diet should be enough to keep our levels normal. Many people are taking zinc to protect themselves from Covid. Taking prolonged, high doses of zinc is not safe and can lead to a copper deficiency, and significant long term usage can put you at greater risk of developing prosate cancer, lowered immune function and low HDL. 

Some symptoms of zinc deficiency include: Rash, changes in taste, sight and smell, difficulty with wound healing, hair loss, impotence and poor growth and development. People with Crohn’s disease, Ulcerative Colitis , Chronic renal disease, sickle cell, diabetes and chronic diarrhea are also at risk of zinc deficiency. If you are going to take supplemental zinc, it is best to take it one hour before or two hours after meals. If you have an upset stomach, you can take it with food. The  most absorbable form is zinc picolinate. Do not take zinc if you are currently taking amiloride (a diuretic). The recommended dosage is 11 mg for men and 8 mg for women.

It is best to get our zinc from food. It is important to note that phytates, which are found in whole grains, legumes and cereals, can bind to zinc and inhibit absorption. Some great sources of zinc include:

  • Oysters
  • Crab
  • Mussels
  • Lobster
  • Poultry
  • Beef
  • Poultry
  • Shellfish
  • Oatmeal
  • Green Peas
  • Nuts and seeds: pumpkin, cashews, hemp, almonds
  • Mushrooms
  • Asparagus

Stay away from high dose supplements and always consult your physician or RD when in doubt. Food is always a safe way to incorporate zinc ito your diet. Only us zinc supplements when medically necessary/advised by your physician. Zinc is an important nutrient that can easily be found in food.

 

 

Katie Webster

Source: EatingWell Magazine, November/December 2017

 

 
 

Recipe Summary

Active: 45 mins
Total: 45 mins
Servings: 18
Nutrition Profile:

Ingredients

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Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Coarsely chop peas and transfer to a large bowl. Add crab and scallions and toss to combine. Stir in panko. Whisk egg, 2 tablespoons sour cream, 1/2 teaspoon ginger and salt in a small bowl. Pour over the crab mixture and stir to combine. Form into 18 cakes, about 1 generous tablespoon each.

  • Whisk the remaining 1/4 cup sour cream and 1/2 teaspoon ginger with mayonnaise, sesame oil, rice vinegar and cayenne in a bowl until well combined.

  • Heat 2 tablespoons avocado oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium and add half the crab cakes. Cook until browned, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Transfer to a serving platter. Repeat with the remaining 2 tablespoons oil and remaining crab cakes.

  • Serve the crab cakes with the aioli and garnish with scallions, if desired.

Tips

To make ahead: Prepare through Step 2; refrigerate crab mixture and aioli separately for up to 1 day.

Nutrition Facts

 

84 calories; protein 3.8g; carbohydrates 3.4g; dietary fiber 0.6g; sugars 0.5g; fat 6.2g; saturated fat 1.2g; cholesterol 28.3mg; vitamin a iu 158.8IU; vitamin c 1.2mg; folate 5.1mcg; calcium 21.1mg; iron 0.9mg; magnesium 2.4mg; potassium 20.4mg; sodium 143.9mg. 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

What You Need To Know About Menopause

January 8th, 2021

Menopause is a natural phase of life, yet it is rarely discussed. According to NAMS (North American Menopause Society), menopause is defined as the final menstual period, confirmed after afetr 12 months of no menstrual bleeding. Perimenopuase starts approximately 4 years before this event. Age of onset varies, but typically occurs between the ages of 45-55. Menopause is accompanied by many side effects, some of which are: brain fog, hot flashes, lack of libido, difficulty sleeping and weight gain. There is also greater risk of certain health conditons: Osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. As challenging as this time of life can be, there are things you can do to make it easier.

  • Maintain a healthy weight. Weight gain is normal during midlife due to fluctuating hormones, stress and decreased calorie needs. Following a low calorie, low fat diet with reduced calories, keeping a food log to stay accountable and stay as active as possible. The goal is at least 150 minutes of aerobic activity a week. Newer studies suggest women in menopause would benefit from 300 minutes a week of aerobic activity.
  • Maintain lean muscle mass. Make sure to consume enough protein (1.0-1.2 g/kg body weight), which can limit decline of muscle and do resistance training a few times a week.
  • Consume a balanced, low fat diet with a focus on vegetables, fruits, low fat dairy, lean protein, and whole grains. Limit red meat, sugar, spicy foods, caffeine and high saturated fats and trans fat. Increase fatty fish consumption to 2 times per week for those healthy Omega 3 fats. Make sure you are consuming 25 mg of fiber a day and consider a probiotic supplement as well as Vitamin D3.
  • Reduce alcohol consumption and do not smoke.
  • Practice stress reduction techniques on a regular basis such as meditation (happify, headsapce, and calm are a few apps) or yoga.
  • Plant estrogens such as isoflavones, found in soybeans, lentils, chickpeas and other legumes and lignans-flax, whole grains and some fruits and vegetables potentially can reduce menopausal symptoms, but research is very limited.
  • Have good sleep habits. Go to bed and wqake at the same time. Do not engage with electronics before bed and keep your room cool. Have a cut off time for fluids so that you are less likely to wake up in the middle of the night to go to the bathroom.
  • Talk to your physician if hormone replacement or bio identical hormones would be a fit for you. Do not take supplements without discussing with your physician first. SSRI’s are also used to reduce the symptoms of menopause and can also be discussed with your physician.

Do not suffer in silence. This is a life change that all women go through and should be destygmatized. There is no shame and women should not have to just suffer through it. Reach out to your physician and RD for help, thats what they are there for!

This Mediterranean stew is a healthy dinner chock-full of vegetables and hearty chickpeas. A drizzle of olive oil to finish carries the flavors of this easy vegan crock-pot stew. Swap out the chickpeas for white beans for a different twist, or try collards or spinach in place of the kale. Any way you vary it, this stew is sure to go into heavy rotation when you are looking for healthy crock-pot recipes.

 

Sarah Epperson

Source: EatingWell.com, November 2019

 

 

Recipe Summary

Active: 15 mins
Total: 6 hrs 45 mins
Servings: 6
Ingredients
 
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Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Combine tomatoes, broth, onion, carrot, garlic, oregano, salt, crushed red pepper and pepper in a 4-quart slow cooker. Cover and cook on Low for 6 hours.

  • Measure 1/4 cup of the cooking liquid from the slow cooker into a small bowl. Add 2 tablespoons chickpeas; mash with a fork until smooth.

  • Add the mashed chickpeas, kale, lemon juice and remaining whole chickpeas to the mixture in the slow cooker. Stir to combine. Cover and cook on Low until the kale is tender, about 30 minutes.

  • Ladle the stew evenly into 6 bowls; drizzle with oil. Garnish with basil. Serve with lemon wedges, if desired.

Tips

Equipment: 4-qt. slow cooker

Nutrition Facts

191 calories; protein 5.7g; carbohydrates 22.9g; dietary fiber 5.6g; fat 7.8g; saturated fat 1g; vitamin a iu 5379.6IU; vitamin c 32.7mg; folate 39.3mcg; calcium 128mg; iron 2.1mg; magnesium 33.8mg; potassium 309.5mg; sodium 415.5mg; thiamin 0.1mg.